Thursday, January 17, 2019

REMINDER:Cornelius Eady, Robert Gibbons, and JP Howard at Park Plaza Restaurant Sat, 1/26/19



REMINDER:


HAPPY NEW YEAR FROM BROWNSTONE POETS!

Mark your calendar for Three Powerful Poets to Ring in another year for poetry at Park Plaza Restaurant!







Three powerful poets Cornelius Eady, Robert Gibbons, and JP Howard will feature for Brownstone Poets on Saturday, January 26 at 2:30 p.m. at Park Plaza Restaurant in historic Brooklyn Heights. Poetry grows in Brooklyn Heights, and there's an open mic as well. Come enjoy an afternoon of poetry and delicious food at this cozy family-owned restaurant.




CORNELIUS EADY
ROBERT GIBBONS
JP HOWARD

Park Plaza Restaurant

220 Cadman Plaza West near Clark St. and Pineapple Walk

Brooklyn, NY 11201

718 - 596 - 5900


FACEBOOK EVENT:

https://www.facebook.com/events/2199597443431909/

Subways:

Take the A or C to High Street, 2 or 3 to Clark Street

R to Court Street

4 or to 5 Borough Hall

For more directions:

Please check the MTA's "The Weekender" for all transit updates.

http://web.mta.info/weekender.html

$5 Donation – plus Food/Drink - Open-Mic

Curated by Patricia Carragon




Bios



Cornelius Eady is the author of Hardheaded Weather (G.P. Putnam’s Sons, 2008); Brutal Imagination (2001), which was a finalist for the 2001 National Book Award in Poetry; The Gathering of My Name (1991), which was nominated for the Pulitzer Prize; BOOM BOOM BOOM (1988); Victims of the Latest Dance Craze (1985), which was chosen by Louise GlückCharles Simic, and Philip Booth for the 1985 Lamont Poetry Selection of The Academy of American Poets. In 1996, Eady and poet Toi Derricote founded Cave Canem, a nonprofit organization serving black poets and acting as a safe space for intellectual engagement and critical debate. In 2016, she and Eady accepted the National Book Foundation’s Literarian Award for Outstanding Service to the American Literary Community on behalf of Cave Canem. He has collaborated with jazz composer Deidre Murray in the production of several works of musical theater, including You Don’t Miss Your WaterRunning Man, a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize in Drama in 1999    






Robert Gibbons graduated from the English Department at City College in the Spring of 2018. He won the Robert Dejur Prize for Poetry. He has attended the Disquiet Festival in Lisbon, Portugal in the Summer of 2017 and the Norman Mailer Residency in 2016. He has been published in Killer Whale, Suisun Valley Review, Turtle Island Review, and so many that it is difficult to enumerate. His first collection of verse, Close to the Tree, was published in 2012 by Three Rooms Press.







JP Howard’s debut poetry collection, SAY/MIRROR (The Operating System)was a 2016 Lambda Literary finalist. She is also the author of bury your love poems here(Belladonna*). JP is a 2019 featured author in Lambda Literary’s LGBTQ Writers in Schools program. JP curates Women Writers in Bloom Poetry Salon and has received fellowships and grants from Cave Canem, VONA, Lambda, Astraea and Brooklyn Arts Council (BAC). Her poetry and essays have appeared or are forthcoming in Academy of American Poets, Anomaly, Apogee Journal, The Feminist Wire, Split this Rock, Muzzle Magazine, and The Best American Poetry Blog. JP holds a BA from Barnard College, an MFA in Creative Writing from The City College of New York and a JD from Brooklyn Law School. Visit JP online at:http://www.jp-howard.com.

Sunday, January 6, 2019

Interview for the Wombwell Rainbow, January 5, 2019




Interview for the Wombwell Rainbow, January 5, 2019







Thank you Paul Brookes for your interview. 






Patricia Carragon’s recent publications include Bear Creek Haiku, First Literary Review-East, A Gathering of the Tribes, The Café Review, Muddy River Poetry Review, Poetrybay, and Krytyka Literacka. Her latest books are The Cupcake Chronicles (Poets Wear Prada, 2017) and Innocence (Finishing Line Press, 2017). Patricia hosts the Brooklyn-based Brownstone Poets and is the editor-in-chief of its annual anthology. She is an executive editor for Home Planet News Online. 
Websites:

1.     What inspired you to write poetry?

As a child, I would write and illustrate a make-believe newspaper. However, I wasn’t encouraged to write until the early '90s when I wrote witty pitches for my Brunch ’n Fun social activities at St. Bartholomew’s Church in Manhattan. One friend encouraged me to explore my literary muse. Another friend said that my eulogy for Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis had poetic resonance.

2.     Who introduced you to poetry?

As a child, I admired Emily Dickinson, but found it impossible to write poetry. It was until my adult years that I started writing, thanks to people who believed that I have the gift for words.

3.     How aware were you of the dominating presence of older poets?

Starting out on the poetry circuit in the Fall of 2003, most of the poets were older. I’ve befriended several older poets who offered guidance and support. They taught me what I needed to learn, therefore grooming me to be the poet that I am today.

4.     What is your daily writing routine?

I don’t have a daily routine, because, unlike some writers, I don’t need it. I have a very busy schedule between my job, life, my Brownstone Poets Reading series, et al. When I don’t have the time to sit down and focus on my craft, I need not worry, because when I do, my muse works overtime.

5.     What motivates you to write?

Dreams, listening to music, riding the subways, and life’s experiences.

6.     What is your work ethic?

My work ethic is constant. I’m always in motion, whether it may be writing, working at my job, cleaning house, running errands, cooking, baking, snapping pictures, and more. I like to keep busy and as a night owl, I tend to do my best work at night.

7.     How do the writers you read when you were young influence you today?

When I read works by Emily Dickinson, William Butler Yeats, and Fyodor Dostoyevsky, I’ve learned that metaphors and words express emotion. Sometimes, you can say less and mean more, like Ernest Hemingway and Matsuo Basho, especially in writing haiku.


8.     Who of today's writers do you admire the most
and why?


I’m into books by Japanese novelist Haruki Murakami. I can relate to his work since I’m currently exploring my usage of dreams and the metaphysical world in my poems, haiku, and fiction.

Read more at:

https://thewombwellrainbow.com/2019/01/05/wombwell-rainbow-interviews-patricia-carragon/?fbclid=IwAR1t8OSnLzmbQoNyGVMCLapS_Hy2wqv5EOYCpVWHPr7cQ9hZclWcEXbRTm0




BOOKS:




https://www.amazon.com/Brownstone-Poets-Anthology-Patricia-Carragon/dp/1530319226/ref=sr_1_3?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1546817570&sr=1-3&keywords=bROWNSTONE+POETS

Monday, December 31, 2018

Cornelius Eady, Robert Gibbons, and JP Howard at Park Plaza Restaurant Sat, 1/26/19




HAPPY NEW YEAR FROM BROWNSTONE POETS!

Mark your calendar for Three Powerful Poets to Ring in another year for poetry at Park Plaza Restaurant!







Three powerful poets Cornelius Eady, Robert Gibbons, and JP Howard will feature for Brownstone Poets on Saturday, January 26 at 2:30 p.m. at Park Plaza Restaurant in historic Brooklyn Heights. Poetry grows in Brooklyn Heights, and there's an open mic as well. Come enjoy an afternoon of poetry and delicious food at this cozy family-owned restaurant.




CORNELIUS EADY
ROBERT GIBBONS
JP HOWARD

Park Plaza Restaurant

220 Cadman Plaza West near Clark St. and Pineapple Walk

Brooklyn, NY 11201

718 - 596 - 5900


FACEBOOK EVENT:

https://www.facebook.com/events/2199597443431909/

Subways:

Take the A or C to High Street, 2 or 3 to Clark Street

R to Court Street

4 or to 5 Borough Hall

For more directions:

Please check the MTA's "The Weekender" for all transit updates.

http://web.mta.info/weekender.html

$5 Donation – plus Food/Drink - Open-Mic

Curated by Patricia Carragon




Bios



Cornelius Eady is the author of Hardheaded Weather (G.P. Putnam’s Sons, 2008); Brutal Imagination (2001), which was a finalist for the 2001 National Book Award in Poetry; The Gathering of My Name (1991), which was nominated for the Pulitzer Prize; BOOM BOOM BOOM (1988); Victims of the Latest Dance Craze (1985), which was chosen by Louise GlückCharles Simic, and Philip Booth for the 1985 Lamont Poetry Selection of The Academy of American Poets. In 1996, Eady and poet Toi Derricote founded Cave Canem, a nonprofit organization serving black poets and acting as a safe space for intellectual engagement and critical debate. In 2016, she and Eady accepted the National Book Foundation’s Literarian Award for Outstanding Service to the American Literary Community on behalf of Cave Canem. He has collaborated with jazz composer Deidre Murray in the production of several works of musical theater, including You Don’t Miss Your WaterRunning Man, a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize in Drama in 1999    






Robert Gibbons graduated from the English Department at City College in the Spring of 2018. He won the Robert Dejur Prize for Poetry. He has attended the Disquiet Festival in Lisbon, Portugal in the Summer of 2017 and the Norman Mailer Residency in 2016. He has been published in Killer Whale, Suisun Valley Review, Turtle Island Review, and so many that it is difficult to enumerate. His first collection of verse, Close to the Tree, was published in 2012 by Three Rooms Press.






JP Howard’s debut poetry collection, SAY/MIRROR (The Operating System)was a 2016 Lambda Literary finalist. She is also the author of bury your love poems here (Belladonna*). JP is a 2019 featured author in Lambda Literary’s LGBTQ Writers in Schools program. JP curates Women Writers in Bloom Poetry Salon and has received fellowships and grants from Cave Canem, VONA, Lambda, Astraea and Brooklyn Arts Council (BAC). Her poetry and essays have appeared or are forthcoming in Academy of American Poets, Anomaly, Apogee Journal, The Feminist Wire, Split this Rock, Muzzle Magazine, and The Best American Poetry Blog. JP holds a BA from Barnard College, an MFA in Creative Writing from The City College of New York and a JD from Brooklyn Law School. Visit JP online at: http://www.jp-howard.com.